Quick Links

Useful Links

Dartford Bridge Primary

Music

All the pupils in the DBCPS community, including SEN and disadvantaged pupils, will learn through clear progression that is engaging and exciting. The integrated dimensions of music will weave through the units to encourage the development of musical skills as the learning progresses. This will be through listening and appraising through diverse musical activities, including creating, exploring and performing.

They will study different musical topics throughout their time at DBCPS that will build on previous learning, help them in the future and always engage and excite their learning 

At DBCPS we aim:

  • To develop all children’s love of music.
  • To teach all children to understand and empathise the diversity of the community through musical experiences. 

We do this through the following key concepts:

  • Listening and appraising
  • Musical activities
  • Creating and exploring
  • Performing

 We use an enquiry-based curriculum to support the learning of key music skills including:

  • Listening and appraising
  • Taking part in games
  • Singing
  • Playing
  • Improvising
  • Composing
  • Performing

 In Years 1 to 6 we teach music weekly. This means that skills and knowledge are regularly practised, fluency is built through regular opportunities to practise.

In Year 1 we can recognise the sound and names of some of the instruments we use. Children will know that music has a steady pulse, like a heartbeat and can create rhythms from words, our names, favourite food, colours and animals. To confidently sing or rap five songs from memory and sing them in unison. Learn the names of the notes in their instrumental part from memory or when written down. Children Improvise own tunes on the spot and compose using a simple melody using one, two or three notes.  is like writing a story with music. Everyone can compose. Finally, children will be able to perform, evaluate and can add their ideas to the performance.

In Year 2 we confidently know and sing five songs from memory and sing them in unison. Children will learn why we need to warm up our voices and learn the names of the notes in their instrumental part from memory or when written down. Improvisation is making up your own tunes on the spot. Children can name untuned percussion instruments played in class. Help create three simple melodies with the units using one, three or five different notes.  Learn how the notes of the composition can be written down and changed if necessary. Children can perform, add their ideas, record the and evaluate how they feel about their performance.

In Year 3 we know the style of five songs and will be able to talk about it. Children will know the difference between pulse and rhythm and how they work together to create a song. Children will be able to talk about singing in a group (choir), conductor (a person who the choir can follow). Children will be able to improvise using instruments in the context of the song they are learning to perform. They will listen to and reflect upon the developing composition and make musical decisions about pulse, rhythm, pitch, dynamics and tempo. To record the performance and say how they were feeling, what they were pleased with what they would change and why.

In Year 4 we know five songs from memory and who sang them or wrote them. Children can confidently identify the pulse, rhythm and pitch and can create musical ideas for a group to copy or respond to. They can sing in a choir and listen to the conductor and will be able to talk about how singing makes them feel. Children will treat instruments carefully and with respect and rehearse and perform their part within the context of the song. They will listen to and reflect upon the developing composition and make musical decisions about pulse, rhythm, pitch, dynamics and tempo. Children will be able to talk about the best place to be when performing and how to stand or sit and to record the performance and say how they were feeling, what they were pleased with what they would change and why.

In Year 5 we know five songs from memory, who sang or wrote them, when they were written and why. They can talk about how pulse, rhythm, pitch, tempo, dynamics, texture and structure work together and how they connect in a song. To sing in unison, singing solo, lead vocal, backing vocals or rapping. Play a musical instrument with the correct technique within the context of the Unit song. Select and learn an instrumental part that matches their musical challenge, using one of the differentiated parts – a one-note, simple or medium part or the melody of the song from memory or using notation. Create simple melodies using up to five different notes and simple rhythms that work musically with the style of the Unit song. To record the performance and compare it to a previous performance. To discuss and talk musically about it – “What went well?” and “It would have been even better if...?”

In Year 6 we know five songs from memory, who sang or wrote them, when they were written and why. They can talk about how pulse, rhythm, pitch, tempo, dynamics, texture and structure work together and how they connect in a song. To sing in unison, singing solo, lead vocal, backing vocals or rapping. They know about the style of the songs so they can represent the feeling and context to your audience. To know and talk about different ways of writing music down – e.g. staff notation, symbols. Children will be able improvise using instruments in the context of a song to be performed and choose what to perform and create a programme. To record the performance and compare it to a previous performance and discuss and talk musically about it – “What went well?” and “It would have been even better if...?” 

 

Peripatetic Music

Benefits of Learning a Musical Instrument

There is various research about learning music/instruments linked to Maths as learning to play a musical instrument relies on understanding concepts, such as fractions and ratios, that are important for mathematical achievement. Also, based on a great number of studies, researchers claim that we all respond to music on a neurological level. Music affects our behaviour, psychology and reality perception. Furthermore, music reaches out to develop skills and broaden students’ vision, raising their aspirations and taking significant steps towards securing their futures in the ever changing and challenging world.

At DBCPS we offer a variety of music lessons including flute, violin, piano, clarinet, recorder, guitar, ukulele, trumpet and drums

Contact Tutors Directly to Arrange Lessons

Mrs Stephanie Jarvis

Woodwind Teacher
Tel
: 07545 565764 Email: sjarvis64@hotmail.co.uk

Stephanie plays a variety of woodwind instruments, including recorder, flute, clarinet and alto sax.

She was a Lead Teacher for Music for Advisory Services Kent for 6 years supporting music in Primary and Secondary Schools in the Swanley Area.  She has directed and produced numerous choir and instrumental concerts, the biggest of which was in 2010 when over 500 children performed at The Orchard Theatre in Dartford.

At DBCPS Stephanie teaches whole class, small group and individual woodwind lessons.  She set up and directs the Benenden Experience Day for Kent Music as well as recorder and choir festivals.  She plays for Dartford Concert Band, has been the musical director for 3 productions for the Dartford Amateur Operatic Drama Society (DAODS) and is the Musical Director of Hextable Wind Band.

 

Mr Ben Kelly

Piano/Keyboard, Violin, Guitar, Drums, Brass
Email: bjtkelly@gmail.com

Ben is a multi-instrumentalist who, having graduated from Trinity College of Music in 2008, has been performing internationally with a variety of critically acclaimed artists in Jazz, Pop, Classical, and Electronic music. His music has been featured on BBC Radio 1, 2, 3, and 6.

Ben brings with him 17 years’ experience working in Music Education teaching Piano, Trumpet, Trombone, Violin, Guitar and Ukelele, and Drums.